RATED R 18: Only in Fiji ...Porn is Hollywood

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Did any of you read the article "Hollywood connection "By Geraldine Panapasa?
http://fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=113399

When did a Pornography Film maker become Hollywood? What a joke! The poor gal (Semaima Lagilagi) in the article is innocent, only that the 'baking soda' fever by the reporter and the lack of validation protocol in the Fiji media has led to the labeling of Dale Travillion as a legitimate Hollywood movie maker. The backlash via association will affect this Semaima Lagilagi gal... Working with "HIM" ... Close proximity .... oooooh ....Need I say more? What are you all thinking? Ummm hmm!

Smells of selective public relations (PR). Yet again. Force-feeding us with 'their' stars. Ewww. Vakasisila.

The whole article RRrrreeeeks of FALSE ADVERTISING. Promoting Hollywood as a non-Hollywood is FRAUDULENT. Fijians will think that he is what Lagilagi's feature is promoting him as being - a Hollywood writer, producer, director .... LIE ...LIE..LASULASU. Lagilagi is referencing going to 'beautiful' parts of Fiji as a part of her job with Travillion ...sounds a lot like LOCATION SCOUTING to me ....Hmmmmm. The question that pervades the senses is "Who is getting paid for the 'beautiful' locations during on-site filming?" The going rate in the USA is US$5K per day on private residential properties. Exotic locations ...possibly much more. The difference is, legitimate Hollywood films pay residential properties the minimum of US$15K per day.

Purleez ... "develop talent for small independent Fiji-made films" ... Huh! With his pornography film credits one can assume that Travillion will lead his prospective talents towards his 'road already travelled'. IT IS WHAT HE KNOWS. Who knows maybe they've filmed some of their 'smut' already.

Dale Travillion films:

1. Timeless Obsession(1997) D-Class film with lesbian erotica
2. Heart of Stone (2001) D-Class film with violent erotica
3. Playtime & Dangerous Invitations & Close Enough to Touch D-Class Erotica
4. Gentleman's Bet & Pay D-Class film Erotica
5. Play Time (1994) D-Class film consensual voyeurism Erotica


The list goes on and on .....With all the wannabe porn film busts in Fiji ( Lami, Nadi, Deuba, Pacific Habour and Savusavu) one has to wonder WTF? If it is so criminalised then why is this man being indirectly touted in our Fiji Times? The very same medium that released the following article featured this headline:

Army hunts for pornography stars http://www.fijitimes.com/story.aspx?id=56767

Suppose Fiji through the Fiji Times will single handedly redefine HOLLYWOOD. How embarrassing! Cava qo de Holy "wood"? Just because Travillion's films are featured on the Playboy channel does not solidify him in the way the article promotes his work. No parent in Fiji will allow or encourage their child's creative intelligence to be misdirected towards pornography.



Kate Winslet's - The Reader is art. Dale Travillion's productions are smut films. Travillion is not Stephen Daldry as a director. Travillion is not David Hare (script writer) or Bernhard Schlink (book author). Travillion is not Scott Rudin (producer). Hellllllo this is a no brainer ....Once you go BLUE (porn), the 'Hollies' will reject you. Tainted 'artistry' is un-welcome.

HINT: The Golden Globes and the Oscar's don't have an EROTICA category. Hollywood + Legitimate film artform = Oscar's/Golden Globes/ Sundance/ Cannes/ Tribeca et al

Erotica films + D-Class directors+ D -Class actors = XXX Awards. Mai aso eso! Da sa kurabui ga, ka galu.

Ya na nomuni NEWS!!!!

Vinaka

**B**

Tags: Erotica, Fiji, FilmMaking, Media, Pornography

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Not sure.....maybe....
Bula LauanFLavOr. Porn through the locals was always and still is an underground production. They approach it using the more native looking females. From what I know and what i've heard, the more Melanesian ones are chosen and sometimes they have renown in Fiji. This to me is odd because anyone who is renowned in Fiji, is only a star to those in Fiji.

Productions done outside Fiji featuring Fijians (all races) are more of webisodes and slides, which might've gotten via your mail if you are part of the Fiji circular. Those always work themselves around Fiji emails.

My concern is always over girls of renown in Fiji who are probably being filmed whilst having consensual sex with some guy/gal and are unaware of ideally placed hidden cameras - It's happened - back in the 90s. The other is rather obvious, webcam sex and skype sex, where I am informed that some of our community's girls are displaying EVERYTHING and oftentimes when they part ways with their current boyfirends, the guys spread "IT" around.

Fiji's girls/women in and outside Fiji need to exercise some caution. Have fun but don't be stupid.

Vinaka.

**B**
I noticed this article on yesterday's Fiji Times Online feature section and thought I add it on to this thread, being that it is topic appropriate.

From a neutral standpoint, I couldn't help but think that although the article is well written, it was devoid in highlighting womens usage of pornography and womens ownership of companies who are the top producers of porn. Women in this industry were at the forefront of the MILF (for they introduced it) and the Cougar (the stalking predator), where women play a major role in the merchandising and the distribution of sex toys. Sex toys which are FYI recession proof products worldwide.

Surprisingly, the gist of her article preys upon men who appreciate sex and visual sex as an outlet for them, not delving in to the specific errs of porn addiction which is different to porn appreciation. I get perturbed when I read viewpoints like the author's, which gives off a negative percption of women in general when it comes to pornography. Women have outclassed men in this industry from its creation to its disbursements. Women are even the most noted consumers in the sex industry. Ideologies like the author's were not clearly thought out, to show both sides, which gives women "the stink" of frigidity and insecurities, further supported by her smashing liposuction and the cosmetic medicine industry in mention. Poor self image perhaps? Can't help but think she's out of shape. Then again, the fat, the medically obese and the super fat subcategories within the porn industry are said to be more popular, online and off the shelf. Either she should've just concentrated on the psychological to the physiological effects of pornography, being gender indiscriminant in her judgment or she should've purely focused on physicality of women portrayed in ONE ELEMENT in pornography who are generally dolled up women next door, which is consciously done by these porn producers for relatablility to their audience. Porn to audience and NOT audience copying porn. She obviously relates them (the actresses) with the obvious subtext that they are somewhat and somehow superior to her - the perfection of it all, where the majority are average women.

Many women strive for all around perfection, which does not equate their attempts to similate porn stars, who are not the ideal woman to women, unlike the author who seemingly exudes the subtext that they are better than her. IF her man is distracted with porn, get a clue - play with him!!!!!! D-class actors are not your competition or should be allowed to ruin the quality of your bedroom. My question to the author is, why did she account for the financial figures from the cosmetic industry and NEGLECTED citing the figures from the porn industry in general. How much did they make from their DVD sales? Rentals? Downloads? Individual sites? Cam girl and cam boys? Merchandising of products and brand? Advertising? Personal incomes of ALL involved?

Further, her mention of cosmetic surgery is most unfair in aligning the whole industry to pornography. Given that breast implants were popularized and tested on sex models and porn actors, in its early days, doesn't give the author the right to blemish a entire field of reconstructive and cosmetic surgery within Medicine, especially during the month of October - BREAST AWARENESS MONTH. FYI - A fair percentage of earnings from Breast Reconstruction come directly from post mastectomy patients. Most inconsiderate and arrogant.
Only in Fiji!



Vinaka.

**B**
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Porn: not just a little harmless fun
Gail Dines
Sunday, October 17, 2010
Fiji Times

OVER the years I have come to understand how and why my lectures to students on pornography stir up extreme emotions in men.

What I do in my presentations is take the very images that users have viewed privately and with pleasure, and I project them on to a screen in a public forum.

In the decidedly nonsexual arena of a US university auditorium, men are asked to think critically about what the images say about women, men and sexuality. Stripped of an erection, men are invited to examine their porn use in a reflective manner while thinking seriously about how images seep into their lives.

In one college, my questioning the real-world implications of such fantasy elicited neither interest nor curiosity but a kind of consuming rage that closed down the possibility of reflection, analysis and reason. The rage was directed at two places, both female -- either the women in the industry or me -- and it certainly conveyed to all women in the room what happens to those of us who don't follow the porn party line.

Conversely, the men at another university seized the opportunity to explore how porn had affected them; the result was a serious and painful reflection of their porn use that left me, and many people in the audience, deeply moved.

Although not all compulsive users, these men talked about their feelings of inadequacy relating to sex after using porn. Whether it was their inability to bring their girlfriends to a screaming orgasm, their need to conjure up porn images to reach their own orgasm with their girlfriends, their "too small" penis or their tendency to ejaculate "too quickly", they were using porn sex as their yardstick and they all failed to measure up.

I suspect that the reason many men reject the opportunity to ask reflective questions is they don't want to end up in pain, despairing about how porn affects their sexuality, relationships and interactions with women.

Moving out of the porn world's tightly controlled version of reality and into a space where one has to delve inside for an emotional stocktaking of porn's impact on the body and mind is not easy. For most of their lives, the culture told men that pornography is fun and harmless and all about fantasy.

Many of the men seeking a one-on-one discussion after presentations tell me they became increasingly agitated while listening as they began realising just how their porn use had spilled over into their sex lives, whether with wives, girlfriends or hook-up partners. What they had thought were idiosyncratic problems suddenly looked somewhat different when porn was added to the equation.

Asking how porn affects its users is to open up the proverbial can of worms. Some argue that porn has no effect in the real world, while others, especially anti-porn feminists, view pornography as material that encourages and justifies the oppression of women. Probably the biggest single argument marshalled against porn having an effect on users is the "porn is fantasy" claim, which argues fantasy is in the head and stays there, never to leak into the real world of relationships, sex, love and intimacy.

This argument holds that men are not simply dupes who look at porn in a literal sense, taking the images at face value, but rather sophisticated consumers who enjoy porn for the playful fantasy it is, enjoying its excessive transgressions, silly plotlines, caricatured bodies and sexual shenanigans that always end in screaming orgasms for her and copious amounts of semen for him.

Afterwards, the argument continues, guys go back to the real world, unaffected and unchanged. To argue otherwise, some porn advocates maintain, is to fall into the trap of confusing fantasy with reality.

Indeed, pornography, like most media images, creates a world that, on some level, we know is not true. But it is an enormous leap to say that because porn is not an accurate version of how things are in the world, it then has no real-world effects.

Many women, for example, know the image of the model in the ads is an airbrushed, technologically enhanced version of the real thing, but that doesn't stop us buying products in the hope that we can imitate an image of an unreal woman.

No matter how fantastical the images of women are, they do, to varying degrees, affect the lives of most women.

One powerful example of this effect is the growth of the plastic surgery industry.

According to the American Society of Aesthetic and Plastic Surgery, in 10 years there has been a 465 per cent increase in the total number of cosmetic procedures: more than 12 million procedures occur annually (for liposuction, facelifts, the "bionic package"-- that is, the tummy tuck, the breast job, the facial rejuvenation). Americans spend just under $US12.5 billion ($13bn) a year on plastic surgery, and that figure is rapidly increasing.

How porn is implicated in rape is complex and multilayered. Clearly, not all men who use porn rape, but what porn does is create what some feminists call a "rape culture" by normalising, legitimising and condoning violence against women.

In image after image, violent and abusive sex is presented as hot and deeply satisfying for all parties. These messages in porn chip away at the social norms that define violence against women as deviant and unacceptable, norms that are already constantly under assault in a male-dominated society.

In most mass-produced images a woman has no bodily integrity, boundaries or borders that need to be respected. Combined, these images tell us that violation of these boundaries is what she seeks and enjoys. This is one among many rape myths that porn disseminates to users. Embedded in porn are numerous other myths, all of which seek to present sexual assault as a consensual act rather than an act of violence.

Not every man who uses porn will accept these rape myths. To argue such a point does not account for the variations that exist among users and would reduce the effects debate to one effect: rape.

But what anti-porn feminists are saying is that such myths promote a culture that will affect men in myriad ways: some will rape but many more will beg, nag and cajole their partners into sex or certain sex acts, and more still will lose interest in sex with other human beings. Some will use women and disregard them when done, some will be critical of their partner's looks and performance, and many will see women as one-dimensional sex objects who are less deserving of respect and dignity than men, in and out of the bedroom.

People not immersed in pop culture tend to assume what we see today is just more of the same stuff that previous generations grew up with. After all, every generation has had its hot and sultry stars who led expensive and wild lives compared with the rest of us.

But what is different about today is not only the hypersexualisation of mass-produced images but also the degree to which such images have overwhelmed and crowded out any alternative images of being female.

Today's tidal wave of soft-core porn images has normalised the porn star look in everyday culture to such a degree that anything less looks dowdy, prim and downright boring. Today, a girl or young woman looking for an alternative to the Britney, Paris, Lindsay look will soon come to the grim realisation that the only alternative to looking f . . kable is to be invisible.

One show that popularised porn culture was Sex and the City, a show that supposedly celebrated female independence from men. At first glance this series was a bit different from others in its representation of female friendships. It also seemed to provide a space for women to talk about their own sexual desires, desires that were depicted as edgy, rebellious and fun.

Getting a man and keeping him were central to the narrative, and week after week we heard about the trials and tribulations of four white, privileged heterosexual women who found men who take their sexual cues from porn.

One night Charlotte hears noises coming from the bathroom and, thinking her husband is crying, she walks in, only to see him masturbating to porn. These examples show how the Sex and the City women capitulate to the pornography that invades their sex lives. In their desire to get a man and keep him, they were willing to do anything, even if they felt uncomfortable.

As pop culture begins to look more and more pornographic, the actual porn industry has had to become more hard-core to distinguish its products from those images found on MTV, in Cosmopolitan and on billboards.

The problem for pornographers is that they are quickly running out of new ways to keep users interested. So one of the big questions they have to grapple with today is how to keep maximising their profits in

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